“women, children, persons with disabilities, and other marginalised groups”

Fresh from the “you couldn’t make it up department” word reaches me from Geneva where the World Information Society review process is underway.  Two days ago the representative of the  French Government noted ” the need to ensure that the Internet is open to women, children, persons with disabilities, and other marginalised groups.”

I am pretty sure that if you add together everyone in those categories you will find they make up a majority of today’s internet users so the internet is clearly already open to them but what is undoubtedly true is that their interests are frequently overlooked because there is an institutional bias towards imagining that every internet user is………..you can fill in the dots. I’m going to try to get back to a short blogs regime.

By the way well done Ecuador, UK and Tunisia for raising their voices about children’s and young people’s interests as internet users.

About John Carr

John Carr is one of the world's leading authorities on children's and young people's use of digital technologies. He is Senior Technical Adviser to Bangkok-based global NGO ECPAT International, Technical Adviser to the European NGO Alliance for Child Safety Online, which is administered by Save the Children Italy and an Advisory Council Member of Beyond Borders (Canada). Amongst other things John is or has been an Adviser to the United Nations, ITU, the European Union, the Council of Europe and European Union Agency for Network and Information Security and is a former Board Member of the UK Council for Child Internet Safety. He is Secretary of the UK's Children's Charities' Coalition on Internet Safety. John has advised many of the world's largest internet companies on online child safety. In June, 2012, John was appointed a Visiting Senior Fellow at the London School of Economics and Political Science. More: http://johncarrcv.blogspot.com
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